Tata Hexa Overview

The Tata Hexa has been in the works for a considerable amount of time. It was first showcased at the 2016 Auto Expo, and the brand’s new flagship model serves as a replacement for the Aria. Though it shares the Aria’s platform, they’ve tweaked the styling broadly and equipped the car comprehensively to attract the young and style conscious buyer. It goes without saying that the first impression of this SUV is quite impressive, nonetheless. We drove the car extensively and this review will tell you whether the Hexa was worth the long wait. For information on contact details of Tata car dealers in New Delhi

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Tata Hexa Style

From front and centre, the Hexa strikes the right note. Having seen the other test-drive Hexas coming up in the mirrors during our drive, I knew it had the “get out of my way” quotient down pat. Tata say that every panel on the Hexa has been redesigned, so nothing is shared with the Aria. It clearly feels that way. Up close you can see that the aggression is crafted with class. There is a bull-horn like chrome strip sitting along the bottom of the grille. Gently rounded hexagonal forms texture the grille, giving a sense of keen attention. The clamshell bonnet with its masculine lines and the gaping air vents below give the Hexa’s claim to being an SUV quite a boost. The double-barrel headlamps are the only familiar bits here.

Switch around to the other end and you will see that there is a distinct squareness to the design. The small spoiler also accentuates a more upright stance. The slim D-pillar-mounted tail lamps have been done away with; instead there are chunky angular lamps that wrap around onto the tail gate. There’s enough chrome on the tailgate to please most Indians. The only awkward bit at the rear are the hockey-stick shaped lights that sit on the bumper.

Viewed from the side, the connection to the Aria is all too obvious. But, the rugged cladding and the 19-inch wheels help the Hexa strike a strong pose. The drop down elements from the roof towards the D-pillar and the fin on the shoulder give it a distinctive look. This is where you realise the Hexa is massive – it is longer and wider than the Mahindra XUV500, and the Innova Crysta. Its 2850mm wheelbase is also the longest, albeit identical to the Aria. There are clear benefits of these dimensions as we can see on the inside.

Tata Hexa Comfort

The dashboard layout of the Hexa looks premium thanks to the new design additions and controls made of fresh-looking materials like chrome trim used with glossy black and soft grain plastic. The instrument cluster is easy to read and except for the low-set air-con controls, all functions are easily accessible on the dash.

We however noticed that the centre console was devoid of storage spaces barring the cup holder behind the gear shifter and the centre armrest. The seats are draped in a leather look-alike upholstery with contrast stitching that feels rich. In fact the front seats offer a comfortable drive thanks to the ample contours with lumbar, good back and appropriate thigh suppo

Similarly, the middle row seats have identical contours and offer good support, headroom and lots of legroom for the occupants. Entry to the third row of seats is by tumbling the second row, and while the seats offer hardly any support, headroom and space for adults is also confined. With the last row up, the boot can only take a few soft bags and a thin suitcase at the most. To stuff anything more, the last row needs to be folded but it doesn’t fold flat either.

Tata Hexa Gearbox

The Tata Hexa has a 2.2-litre turbo diesel engine. This comes with two options – a 148bhp engine and 154bhp. The first one comes with a five-speed manual and the more powerful one has two options: six-speed manual or six-speed automatic. The NVH levels on the engine are fairly low. The torque of this engine is more than sufficient for daily driving. One doesn’t require too many gear shifts in the city or highway driving.

The six-speed manual feels a bit notchy. It does take some getting used too. The manual comes with four driving modes in the 4×4. These are Auto, Rough Road, Comfort and Dynamic. The Auto and Rough Road are 4×4, while the other two work on 4×2. On the other hand, the automatic transmission is fabulous. The shifts are smooth even downshifts. Put it in the Sport mode and you shall be amazed in the manner it performs. There is also the tiptronic mode that responds well.

In terms of fuel efficiency, the Tata Hexa scores 10 km/l with the automatic in city and about 14 km/l on the highway. The manual version of the Tata Hexa will return an efficiency of 11 km/l in city and about 14.5 km/l on the highway. We haven’t driven the five-speed manual engine but the range will be between the six-speed manual and automatic.

Tata Hexa Rideing

Hexa is offered in manual six-speed and automatic six-speed options. While the former comes with “Super Drive Modes” for surface-specific options, the automatic Hexa was tested for this review. And it was an absolute breeze.

The Hexa automatic offers a no-fuss, no-fancy drive with power coming up in a decently linear manner. No, it is not zippy but then, it would be unfair to expect a car this big to whizz around in city traffic. What is good though is that it moves in a leisurely enough manner in city traffic to ensure one doesn’t miss out on those important meetings.

Push the pedal harder and there is that slight sound of a muffled diesel gruff but on the whole, the Varicor 400 engine does a fantastic job of keeping itself composed. This and the extremely-well insulated cabin ensure that the crudeness of diesel experienced on most cars is disguised.

Where the Hexa does lag is in speeds well over three-digits. While getting there is no problem at all, the steering system sends back minor yet very noticeable vibrations – enough to make the slightly jittery driver even more jittery. This was experienced each time the car was taken well past 110kmph in this review.

Tata Hexa Safety

The Hexa equipment list consists of six airbags, ESP, traction control, ABS with EBD, climate control with vents on all three rows, auto headlamps, rain sensing wipers, and reverse parking sensors with a camera. There’s also power mirrors with demister, cruise control, rear sun blinds, an eight-way adjustable driver’s seat (non-electric), a multi-function steering wheel, and a 5-inch touchscreen infotainment system with JBL speakers, to name a few.

It does miss out on features like powered seats and keyless go, which is a norm in the segment. There’s no sunroof either, which the rivals offer. In short, manual gearbox variants include XM and XT in six and seven seater options along with the choice of automatic transmissions called XMA and XTA. A 4×4 manual model is also available on the XT variant.

Tata Hexa Price in Hyderabad

Tata Hexa Ex-Showroom Price in Hyderabad ranges from 11,75,515/- (Hexa XE) to 17,09,791/- (Hexa XT 4X4). Get best offers for Tata Hexa from Tata Dealers in Hyderabad. Check for Hexa price in Hyderabad at Carzprice

Tata Hexa Bottomline

Has Tata done enough with the Hexa to let it succeed? We think so as this car has everything expected from a vehicle in the segment. It lacks things like keyless start, proper front storage spaces and is quite massive in terms of length- an issue that will pop up for parking space starved city dwellers. But on the positive side the feature list is comprehensive; it is quite spacious, has solid road presence and will let you go to most places without thinking twice. For the Hexa to now completely succeed Tata must price it in such a way that it undercuts its main rival- the Mahindra XUV500 variant-for-variant. Given the price range that we believe it will exist in, the Hexa is also a competitor for the range of D-segment sedans.

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